Of Ferguson and Michel Brown

 

miles 2

1. On the day he was shot, Michel Brown was having a thug day, so you can hardly call him a good guy.

2.  The officer’s eye had been severely injured in the first encounter, in the police car with a struggle over his gun, so as Michel Brown was later approaching him, the officer’s vision was impaired and he had  to be concerned about another struggle over the gun.

3.  Of all the thousands of police encounters around the country, there are very few  (a small fraction of 1%)  shootings.  And the much bigger problem is that a super-majority of Blacks killed were at the hand of other Blacks.  Doesn’t that mean that strict law enforcement benefits the Black community?

4.  Nevertheless, Blacks may have a point that they endure extra scrutiny by the police, and they don’t like being stopped so often (the BMW “black man walking” thing).  This is really the only thing ever suffered by nearly all of the protesters.

5.  Statistically, Black men do perpetrate more than their share of crime.  And criminal activity is a big part of “urban culture.”  And there is too much acceptance of crime in the Black community — remember the “don’t snitch” movement. Police have an impossible job when working in high crime areas, because criminals don’t like police around them, and the lives of policemen are in jeopardy when they do their jobs.

6.  In the criminal justice system, Blacks are afforded the constitutional rights of a jury trial and the “guilt beyond a reasonable doubt” standard.  “No justice, no peace,” the mantra of race activists, is a call for mob rule and disregards these same protections for the officer.

7.  When politicians justify the anger of the protesters and accept their violence and criminal destruction of property, this is akin to appeasement of enemy aggressors and terrorists.   

It is as though they are saying “We understand why you are mad and therefore it is OK for you to loot and burn.”

Well, it’s not OK. 


Ferguson USA

1. On the day he was shot, Michel Brown was having a thug day, so you can hardly call him a good guy.

2.  The officer’s eye had been severely injured in the first encounter, in the police car with a struggle over his gun — so as Michel Brown was later approaching him, the officer’s vision was impaired and he had  to be concerned about another struggle over the gun.

3.  Of all the thousands of police encounters around the country, there are very few  (a small fraction of 1%)  shootings.  And the much bigger problem is that great majority of Blacks killed were at the hand of other Blacks.   Doesn’t that mean that strict law enforcement benefits the Black community?

4.  Nevertheless, Blacks may have a point that they endure extra scrutiny by the police, and they don’t like being stopped so often (the BMW “black man walking” thing).  This is the source of the outrage of the (non-professional) protester.

5.  Statistically, Black men do perpetrate more than their share of crime.  And criminal activity is a big part of “urban culture.”   And there is too much acceptance of crime in the Black community — remember the “don’t snitch” movement.  Police have an impossible job when working in high crime areas, because criminals don’t like police around them, and their lives are in jeopardy when they do their jobs.

6.  In the criminal Justice system Blacks are afforded the constitutional rights of a jury trial and the “guilt  beyond a reasonable doubt” standard.  “No justice, no peace”  is  a call for mob rule and disregards these same protections for the officer.

7.  When politicians justify the anger of the protesters and accept their violence and criminal destruction of property, this is akin to appeasement of enemy aggressors and terrorists.    It is as though they are saying “We understand why you are mad and therefore it is OK for you to loot and burn.”

Well, it’s not OK.   And looters and burners ought to be punished.